Reusable Shopping Bags Marion IA

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Reusable Shopping Bags. You will find this article titled "Paper and Plastic Move over…Here Comes Reusable". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Marion, IA that will answer all of your questions about Reusable Shopping Bags.

Walmart Supercenter
(319) 447-2395
5491 Business Highway 151
Marion, IA
Store Hours
Mon-Fri:8:00 am -Sat:8:00 am -Sun:8:00 am -
Pharmacy #
(319) 447-2870
Pharmacy Hours
Monday-Friday: 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Sam'S Club
(319) 393-7746
2605 Blairs Ferry Road Ne
Cedar Rapids, IA
 
Supertarget
(319) 393-1600
1030 Blairs Ferry Rd Ne
Cedar Rapids, IA
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Walmart Supercenter
(319) 390-9922
3601 29Th Avenue S.W.
Cedar Rapids, IA
Store Hours
Mon-Fri:8:00 am -Sat:8:00 am -Sun:8:00 am -
Pharmacy #
(319) 390-9925
Pharmacy Hours
Monday-Friday: 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Hy Vee
(319) 377-4821
2790 7th Ave
Marion, IA
 
Hy-Vee
(319) 364-0135
1440 - 32Nd Street Ne
Cedar Rapids, IA
Store Hours
Open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday.

Walmart Supercenter
(319) 393-0444
2645 Blairs Ferry Rd Ne
Cedar Rapids, IA
Store Hours
Mon-Fri:8:00 am -Sat:8:00 am -Sun:8:00 am -
Pharmacy #
(319) 393-2110
Pharmacy Hours
Monday-Friday: 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Supertarget
(319) 396-4444
3400 Edgewood Rd Sw
Cedar Rapids, IA
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Walmart Supercenter
(319) 462-4311
101 115Th St
Anamosa, IA
Store Hours
Mon-Fri:8:00 am -Sat:8:00 am -Sun:8:00 am -
Pharmacy #
(319) 462-4314
Pharmacy Hours
Monday-Friday: 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wal Mart Supercenter
(319) 447-2862
5491 Bus Hwy 51
Marion, IA
 

Paper and Plastic Move over…Here Comes Reusable

It’s the timeless grocery store rivalry—paper, or plastic? How about, “Neither. I brought my own.” Sounds easy enough, but half the battle is remembering to actually bring those eco-friendly reusable bags back to the store. It’s easy to forget them, lose them, or simply not use them, because it takes a lot less effort to just use store bags, regardless of how bad they are for the environment. Convenience usually wins over eco-consciousness.

Let’s just say you accidentally forgot to bring your reusable bags with you to the store and are forced to choose between paper or plastic. It’s okay. It happens. So, under all that pressure of deciding which is more reusable and which is easier to carry, you choose plastic. You might be able to use it to pack your lunch for a few day, but let’s face it: eventually that bag is going to end up in the trash. The trash can is only the beginning of the toxic journey discarded plastic takes once it leaves your home.

Plastic bags are made mostly from a non-renewable oil energy that produces polyethylene. Polyethylene is cheap to produce, durable, and resistant to chemical breakdown, making it difficult to recycle. Not to mention, to reuse polyethylene requires two-thirds of the new product created to be made from new plastic. Plus, the actual recycling process take a massive amount of non-renewable energy. Sounds pretty bad. Well, it only gets worse.

Plastic never goes away, so every scrap of plastic ever produced still exists and will continue to exist indefinitely. Plastic that is not recycled is dumped (usually into our oceans) and ends up being a deadly snack for an unsuspecting animal. The most horrific graveyard of used plastic is located in the Pacific where tons of discarded polyethylene and other plastics have accumulated to make an island of plastic debris twice the size of the entire state of Texas. Plastic is bad news for the environment and consumers.

With all this discussion on paper, plastic, and B.Y.O.Bag programs, there are rumblings in some states about legislation that would require retailers to charge a nominal fee for each plastic bag used by consumers. Further legislation in the works could eventually end the use of plastic bags altogether. In California, law currently requires retailers to create an in-store recycling program allowing consumers to return used plastic bags. Some argue that banning the use of plastic bags will just force consumers to opt for paper, which is just as damaging to the environment. Essentially your “paper or plastic” decision is really a decision of deforestation or depletion of non-renewable energy.

While state legislators navigate the pros and cons of a long term solution to the use of complimentary retailer bags, many stores have taken their own initiative to be part of the solution and voluntarily adapt before law requires them to.

Pioneers in the reusable bag sector like Trader Joe’s and IKEA have been waging war against plastic bags for years ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Sheer Balance